cathedral_web
Photo: Andrew Day

 This sculpture by Marcus Canning and Christian de Vietri

is an abstract interpretation of the story of 

St George and the Dragon.

It depicts the triumph of good over evil.

Ascalon was the name of St George’s lance in mediaeval

romances, and is derived from the city of Ashkelon in Israel.

The angled pole, white billow and black base

are reminiscent of

the lance of St George

the cloak and steed of St George

and the defeated body of the dragon.

Commissioned by the Chapter

Donated by Mark Creasy

Dedicated to the Glory of God

3 April 2011

cathedral_web
Photo: Andrew Day

 This sculpture by Marcus Canning and Christian de Vietri

is an abstract interpretation of the story of 

St George and the Dragon.

It depicts the triumph of good over evil.

Ascalon was the name of St George’s lance in mediaeval

romances, and is derived from the city of Ashkelon in Israel.

The angled pole, white billow and black base

are reminiscent of

the lance of St George

the cloak and steed of St George

and the defeated body of the dragon.

Commissioned by the Chapter

Donated by Mark Creasy

Dedicated to the Glory of God

3 April 2011